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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikes in response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also killed. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their military response and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international support for israel's position
the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern israel and for the grave loss of life in gaza. i think all of us, across the european union, including also ame
we'll have live reports from gaza and ashkelon, israel, in moments. yesterday, around this time, we reported on hopes for a break in cross border rocket attacks, but a senior hamas official described to cnn as a calming down period. even as diplomats including secretary of state hillary clinton searched for a truce, the fighting last night intensified. israel trained rockets and artillery fire on gaza overnight. 100 confirmed strikes destroyed bridges, tunnels and buildings. hamas returned fire with dozens of rockets, 62. about a third were intercepted by the iron dome defense system. this attack, a bomb, a public bus around lunch time, not far from israel's military headquarters. the blast wounded 24 people, added a new urgency to efforts to reach a cease-fire. the military wing of hamas tweeted to israelis, you opened the gates of hell on yourselves. 40 minutes after the bus bombing, our cameras captured this explosion in gaza city. all the while there was a flurry of diplomating activity. secretary clinton met with palestinian authority mahmoud abbas in the west bank and benjamin
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
a vote, namely to have their own state in israel. obviously we went up to make one more try to make our news note to president abbas and urge him to reconsider. so obviously make his own decisions and he will be back in new york tomorrow. but we thought it was important to make her case one more time. >> sorry, your understanding of the palestinian goal here in terms of this resolution is they expect to get a state out of their? >> that's not what i said. i said it is the old basic overall. >> survey should not be allowed to have anything interim? they either go all the way, he do with the israelis do nothing for the palestinians in between. >> we have made clear and talked about this all week long and i don't think we need to read syndicated own mother time here that this resolution is not owing to take them closer to statehood. it does nothing to get them closer to statehood and it may make the environment more difficult. >> -- any specifics on economic impact in the israelis, do they have on financing? >> i don't have anymore details from from the actual meeting room today, but we've
here at the u.n., it is the u.s. and israel leading against the rest of the world. a u.n. vote on the official membership of palestinians, the vote that the u.s. and israel have been spending a long time trying to stop. the question is, what effect will this have on anything approaching peace in that region? our chief correspondent affairs, andrea mitchell. >> reporter: good evening, on the 65th anniversary of the u.n. giving israel the land to become a state, they voted overwhelmingly to recognize the palestinians, but only as an observer state. and a non-voting official state it is a step for nationhood, and a potential flash place for the middle east. hours earlier, they were already celebrating across the west bank. in ramallah, he made a pizza with tomatoes, olives, and spinach, representing the palestinian flag >> this is what we longed for over 60 years, it is about time a flag that today's u.n. actions will still not make palestine a nation. >> the united nations general assembly is here to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> reporter:
's expected to pass overwhelmingly this afternoon poenl the united states and israel will be voting no. great britain is planning to abstain. nbc's martin fletcher join me, after covering celebrations that began early in ramallah. quite a lot of celebrating among the palestinians. we should stress this is symbolic. martin it will give them access, potentially to the international criminal court of justice, action against israel they've long been wanting to take. doesn't move them toward statehood. the u.s. says this is a step back, not a step forward. from the palestinian perspective, this is long awaited. and achieves a lot of what they've been trying to do on the world stage. >> reporter: what it does, it's a step forward for them, it's a major step forward. but the people i was speaking to in ramallah, palestinians say it's not a big deal. it's not going to change anything on the ground. nevertheless it is a major step forward and something the palestinian leader president has been trying to do for a year he was beaten, if you like, almost into not taking this step last year by the united
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
-to-head. >>> and the vote that could derail peace in the middle east. what the palestinians are gaining, what israel thinks it's losing. i'll talk to both sides. >>> and why a top senate democrat calls the vote provocative and reckless. >>> plus, a return of the most feared man in boxing. iron mike tyson. unvarnished, as always. >> i never had any happiness. >> mike tyson on the state of america -- >> the republican party has to somehow change. >> -- to the state of lindsey lohan. >> she's not as bad as i was but she's catching up. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. you're looking at palestinians celebrating in the streets of ramallah after a history-making vote at the u.n. it granted status to nonmember observer state. what does that really mean to both sides? i will talk to the chief palestinian negotiator and to israel's ambassador to the u.n. >>> we begin with the ultimate power lunch at the white house. president obama and mitt romney face-to-face for the first time since the election and talk about a picture's worth 1,000 words. try a million for this one. only one word really you
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credited with getting israel and gaza to end fighting. let's bring in the "time" bureau chief and got the interview and joins us from tel aviv. thank you for joining us and why is morsi the most important man in the middle east? >> well, for a couple of reasons. i mean, one he is just sort of central to, you know, the sort of what they call a new sunni axis of influence. sort of powerful country is counterweight to iran emerging, you know, thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey, certainly. egypt is just always been. it's the largest most populace county and the sort of anchor. if you're the president of egypt, you should be the most important person in the middle east and the circumstances also favoring morsi and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and another revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> carl, i thought it was interesting you spoke with him about his relationship with president obama. and he seems to think it's a good one. >> yeah. t
that would boost their status on the world stage. the united states and israel have lobbied hard against the move warning it could backfire and actually set back palestinian hopes for full statehood and negotiated peace. but with some key european nations on board, palestinians view the vote as a game changer. cnn's frederik pleitgen reports from the west bank city of ramallah. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york, palestinian president mahmoud abass addressing supporters. the final decision is to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observers state in the united states and the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assemb assembly, the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican. its territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to rectify a grave historical unjustice that the palestinians had undergone beginning with the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> reporte
of this. list. . the indications we have or our convicts we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need an evidence. all of the investigation are -- all of the investigations are made to acquire the evidence so we can go with this evidence to find out who is behind the assassination and through which we will go to the international criminal court. >> okay. two questions for you, jim. first of all, do they have any evidence that that was true, that the israelis perhaps were behind killing arafat? would they take it to the hague? do they have this? >> if they had the evidence, i suppose they could. but the israelis have said we didn't have anything to do with this. they realize how explosive this was. did they want him dead? absolutely. absolutely. as tom friedman wrote in his book "from beirut to jerusalem" they saw arafat like hitler in his bunker, there was that much hatred for the man. he put the palestinians on the map. he resurrected them. he's resurrected at a time when, well, the palestinians are finally, you know, i don't know how he died but i can say what
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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